TFW’s workshop

Discussion in '2mm Lounge' started by Tim Watson, 11 November 2017.

  1. P A D

    P A D Western Thunderer

    Hi Tim,
    Neat idea on the guard irons.

    When and where is the Derby event? It's a long time since I saw CF so I might try and get down to Derby.

    Next up for me is a Gladiator Q9 which visually has a lot in common with Valour.

    Cheers,
    Peter
     
  2. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    The 2mm Diamond Jubilee Show is at the Derby Conference Centre 20-21st June. It will be a cracking good event.

    Tim
     
    P A D likes this.
  3. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    Association muffs on front bogie / pony wheels always look ugly. On Mons Meg I fixed the front wheels with a fibre reinforced resin in a hollow stub axle. Valour is the same.
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    The 0.9 mm diameter fibre post is a material used for restoring endodontically treated teeth. An anodised aluminium pin could work equally well - something perhaps the Association should consider offering.
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    The wheels are Araldited on to the fibre post at the correct B to B with a collar of adhesive around the centre. One could taper the axles to be more prototypical - I did this on Mons Meg - but this is probably a bit more robust.


    Tim
     
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  4. simond

    simond Western Thunderer

    If your friendly local dentist is short of entodontic fibre inserts, eBay sellers have glass fibre pultruded rod which is apparently popular for making fishing floats. The key search term seems to be “stems”. Beware of carbon fibre ones, they’ll be stiffer, perhaps, but conductive.

    Fibreglass Pole Float Stems Clear and Black (30 Stems per Pack) | eBay

    2mm size is useful for doing split axles in 7mm per Steph Dale’s methods.

    Atb
    Simon
     
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  5. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    Three Valours at Missenden Abbey. The bigger ones being made by Tony Gee.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Tim
     
  6. P A D

    P A D Western Thunderer

    Hi Tim,
    WOW! You've got me looking forward to the Q9 now.

    The dome on the 4mm model doesn't look right, but it appears to be just placed for the photo. Are they scratch or kit built models?

    Cheers,
    Peter
     
  7. AJC

    AJC Western Thunderer

    I think it's the same artwork, so the casting is presumably 'acquired' and no, it doesn't look right.

    Adam
     
  8. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    The dome on the 4mm version was a temporary fitment. It shares the same artwork as my one, which is now absolutely, completely, 100% finished and in the hands of Ian Rathbone for painting in full GC livery.

    Tim
     
    Last edited: 8 March 2020
  9. Threadmark: Tube modelling 35 years on.
    Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    I recently retrieved the cardboard placeholder model of York Road tube station from Keen House, prior to going on holiday in Cornwall.
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    This has enabled me to make a good start on the definitive building: which is approximately 35 years since I made the original Cally station. I always like to use a substantial core for my buildings, in this case producing something like a modern concrete building structure.
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    In comparison with its completely hand made predecessor, the new tube station is using the latest in technologies for its construction, with 3D printed window and dental course mouldings courtesy of Richard Wilson with equally superb etched windows and fittings, courtesy of Jim Watt.
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    The front walls are cut straightforwardly from styrene sheet, but there will still be quite a few subtle layers and motifs to add.

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    The interior will be tricky to model,
    as the righthand end is severely truncated in depth. It could actually be modelled with the shutters down - in closed condition (1932 onwards) - but that would be a bit of a shame.
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    We are returning from Cornwall very shortly, but progress on the building should continue. It might, however, be interrupted by this little chap, who we will be getting in mid August.
    [​IMG]

    Tim
     
  10. Lyndhurstman

    Lyndhurstman Western Thunderer

    It’s good to see at least someone has done some modelling west of the Tamar. And (as per) gobsmacking stuff at that. Cute puppy, too. Enjoy!

    Cheers

    Jan
     
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  11. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    York Road tube station is making steady progress: there are many different detailing levels and frills on a Leslie Green-designed London Underground building. The front walls are only loosely fitted at present, as there is a massive amount of work still needed on them. The 3D printed details should come alive once they are sprayed with undercoat.
    [​IMG]
    Now the question for the knowledgable types is this: what is in the front room of the building under York Road Station signage? I have enhanced a previous image to show what looks like a rack on the back wall and maybe a showcase close to the nearer window.
    [​IMG]
    The only overall drawing I have of the station shows a narrow room and, regrettably, does not include a plan view.
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    A sign inside the concourse points to a ticket office, which would be where the room is, but the security would be very poor for such a use.
    [​IMG]
    Over to you, for erudite suggestions. Whatever we decide upon, Jo Public will never see it, but the Up & Down Main Lines operator at the South end will.

    Tim
     
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  12. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    Problem solved by Nick Mitchell and Kevin (Sithlord) on the other site kindly turned up drawings.
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    At least I can now make it accurately.

    Tim
     
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  13. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    The extra drawings have been really helpful in getting the front rooms more correct.
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    The changes don’t look that much, but it makes the building much more plausible. I will probably draw up some artwork for the interiors, but I’m afraid that the urinals will not be modelled as the structure is sliced through by the front of the layout.

    Tim
     
  14. Grahame Hedges

    Grahame Hedges Western Thunderer

    Nice. Looks like a lot of productive research has gone in to it.
     
  15. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    The pilasters and entrance bits on the tube station are nearing completion, apart from some of the decorative motifs. There are about fifty components involved with each opening as there are many layers involved: thank goodness for Evergreen strips. At the top of the pilaster there is a prominent ridge that raps around the sides. This was made by putting two stop cuts across the top of the pilaster and then using a very fine chisel to remove the material between.
    [​IMG]

    The chisel is literally razor sharp and comes from Japan.
    Sujiborido BMC Chisel 0.5mm From Japan for sale online | eBay
    They are eye wateringly expensive, especially the very small versions, but I have a colleague at Guys who can get them when he goes to Tokyo - still expensive though.
    [​IMG]
    With the trough made a little strip of styrene was inserted.
    [​IMG]
    The front walls are beginning to look a bit better now, but I had quite forgotten how much work was involved in making a tube station. It will be interesting to compare it with its older brother, when complete.

    Tim
     
  16. Grahame Hedges

    Grahame Hedges Western Thunderer

    You might have forgotten how much was involved but you're making a good fist of it. It's a pleasure to see such fine architectural modelling and inspiring to see a miniature building rise out of a work bench.
     
    Lyndhurstman likes this.
  17. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    All the fiddly bits are now complete, having been whittled and carved out of styrene.
    [​IMG]
    The main frontage had some fill-in bits at the intersection of the arches.
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    The two main flourishes over the entrance required setting in to the corners, so that the angled front sits correctly.
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    The porthole window surround was made from some strip, bent to shape with a few extra bits added and carved for the detailing.
    [​IMG]
    I will give the whole lot a puff of primer tomorrow, to see if there are areas that need much adjustment and filling.

    Tim
     
    Last edited: 8 August 2020
  18. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    The excellence of the 3D prints from Richard Wilson really shows up now. I think this might turn out better than the original, but it will all depend on the painting.
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    Tim
     
  19. Tim Watson

    Tim Watson Western Thunderer

    Quite a busy time over the last 24 hrs. The front walls were sprayed last night with a variety of tube-like colours. The cement courses were then scribed in with a pair of dividers, through to the white styrene.
    [​IMG]
    Jim Watt’s windows were also sprayed with a dark brown cellulose colour and then lightly weathered (not the most inspiring photograph).
    [​IMG]
    I didn’t want to assemble the front walls onto the structural shell until the interiors were a little more advanced. However, the two corners at the front will need dressing and touching in - a job better done before final assembly with the interiors present. I have therefore glued the three front walls together with impact adhesive against the shell, but with cling film over the relevant parts of the shell so that it can be removed. The observant amongst you will notice that the ceramic station name boards / entrance & exit signs were also painted in, whilst in the flat - quite a tedious job.
    [​IMG]
    As I write this, the whole assembly is bandaged up with elastic bands to hold it stable while the glue sets. With a bit of luck tomorrow, it should all come apart where required and the front facade will then be stuck to a base so that the corners can be worked on. Thence the interiors, roof details, chimneys and south end brick detailing.

    All-in-all, a quite long-winded way of making a building, but it allows progress on various components without manoeuvring oneself into a constructional corner.

    Tim
     
  20. Yorkshire Dave

    Yorkshire Dave Western Thunderer

    The painting will be the key to the Leslie Green building as it will depend on the lighting conditions in which is painted.

    Some photos it appears maroon and in others a terracotta orange.